1887

Abstract

A bacterial strain, designated S9-5, was isolated from moraine samples collected from the north slope of Mount Everest at an altitude of 5 500 m above sea level. A polyphasic study confirmed the affiliation of the strain with the genus . Strain S9-5 was an aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming, non-motile and rod-shaped bacterium that could grow at 10–40 °C, pH 5–8 and with 0–9 % (w/v) NaCl. Q-10 was its predominant respiratory menaquinone. Diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, an unidentified phospholipid, an unidentified aminophospholipid and eight unidentified lipids comprised the polar lipids of strain S9-5. Its major fatty acids were summed feature 8 (C 7 and/or C 6) and C. The G+C content was 65.75mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA sequences showed that strain S9-5 was phylogenetically closely related to DCY91 (98.17 %), K-1-16 (98.11 %) and DSM 17494 (97.39 %). The average nucleotide identity values among strain S9-5 and DCY91, K-1-16 and DSM 17494 were 78.82, 78.87 and 78.29 %, respectively. Based on the morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic data, strain S9-5 (=JCM 34750=GDMCC 1.2714) should represent a novel species of the genus , for which we propose the name sp. nov.

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2022-04-12
2022-07-06
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