1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterial strain, named SJ-16, was isolated from desert soil collected in Inner Mongolia, northern PR China. Strain SJ-16 grew at pH 6.0–11.0 (optimum, pH 8.0–9.0), 4–40 °C (optimum, 30–35 °C) and in the presence of 0–8 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 0–2 %). The strain was negative for catalase and positive for oxidase. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain SJ-16 clustered with 100111 and THG-MD21, and had 98.8, 98.6, 98.3 and <97.9 % of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to strains 100111, THG-MD21, B9 and all other type strains of the genus , respectively. The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C, iso-C, summed feature 3 (C 7 and/or C 6) and summed feature 9 (C 10-methyl and/or iso-C 9). Diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine were the major polar lipids, and ubiquinone-8 was the only respiratory quinone. The genomic DNA G+C content was 69.3 mol%. The digital DNA–DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identity values of strain SJ-16 to 100111, THG-MD21, 4-12 and B9 were 36.9, 37.5, 24.0 and 21.1 %, and 80.9, 80.6, 80.7 and 76.3 %, respectively. Based on phenotypic, physiological and phylogenetic results, strain SJ-16 represents a novel species of the genus , for which the name is proposed. The type strain is SJ-16 (=CGMCC 1.17694=KCTC 82207).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award 31960020)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Ji-QuanSun
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2021-10-11
2021-10-24
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