1887

Abstract

A novel rhizobacterium, designated strain NEAU-GH312, with antibacterial activity against was isolated from rhizosphere soil of rice (Heilongjiang Province, PR China) and characterized with a polyphasic approach. Cells of strain NEAU-GH312 were Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-spore-forming, motile with peritrichous flagella and rod-shaped. Colonies were light orange, convex and semi-translucent on Reasoner's 2A (R2A) agar after 2 days of incubation at 28 °C. Growth was observed on R2A agar at 10–40 °C, pH 4.0–8.0 and with 0–5 % (w/v) NaCl. The respiratory quinone was ubiquinone Q-8. The major cellular fatty acids of strain NEAU-GH312 were C 7 and/or C 6, C and C 7 and/or C 6. The main polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and diphosphatidylglycerol. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed the well-supported affiliation of strain NEAU-GH312 within the genus , close to the type strains of THG-RS2O (98.7 %), NS9 (98.7 %) and TSA1 (98.6 %). Strain NEAU-GH312 had a genome size of 6.68 Mb and an average DNA G+C content of 66.3 mol%. Based on the genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic data obtained in this study, strain NEAU-GH312 could be classified as representative of a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed, with strain NEAU-GH312 (=DSM 109722=CCTCC AB 2019142) as the type strain.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • the national natural science foundation of china (Award 31972291)
    • Principle Award Recipient: XiangjingWang
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2021-09-14
2021-09-24
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