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Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic, rod-shaped and non-motile bacterial strain, designated D-2Q-5-6, was isolated from a soil sample collected from the Arctic region. Strain D-2Q-5-6 was found to grow at 10–43 °C (optimum, 28 °C), at pH 6.0–9.0 (pH 7.0) and in 0–5 % (w/v) NaCl (0–1 %). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain D-2Q-5-6 fell into the genus and shared less than 95.8 % identity with all type strains of recognized species of this genus. The major cellular fatty acids of strain D-2Q-5-6 were summed feature 8 (C 7 and/or C 6; 31.4 %), summed feature 3 (C 7 and/or C 6; 26.8 %) and C 2OH (11.7 %). The polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and sphingoglycolipid. The predominant quinone was identified as Q10. The DNA G+C content of strain D-2Q-5-6 was 64.5 mol%. Based on the results of phylogenetic analysis and distinctive phenotypic characteristics, strain D-2Q-5-6 is concluded to represent a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the species is D-2Q-5-6 (=MCCC 1A06070=KCTC 52311).

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2020-01-06
2020-01-24
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