1887

Abstract

A novel Gram-stain-negative, yellowish-pigmented bacterial strain, designated LA-38, was isolated from activated sludge of wastewater treatment plants in Hanam city, South Korea. Cell of LA-38 were rod-shaped, aerobic, motile and non-spore-forming. In phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA genes, LA-38 clustered with species of the genus and appeared closely related to DSM 5680 (99.2 % similarity), DSM 63 (98.2 %), KCTC 42478 (98.1 %), DSM 15342 (98.1 %), DSM 15341 (98.0 %) and DSM 2082 (97.2 %). The average nucleotide identities between LA-38 and the closely related strains were 79.3–88.5 %, indicating that LA-38 represents a novel species of the genus . The DNA G+C content of the genomic DNA was 69.9 mol% and ubiquinone Q-8 was the predominant respiratory quinone. The major cellular fatty acids (>5 %) were C, cyclo-C, Cω7 and/or Cω6 (summed feature 3), and Cω7 and/or Cω6 (summed feature 8). The major polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine, the major polyamines were 2-hydroxyputrescine and putrescine. ANI calculation, physiological and biochemical characteristics indicated that LA-38 represents a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LA-38 (=KACC 19730=LMG 30805).

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2019-10-29
2019-11-17
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