1887

Abstract

Three chickpea rhizobial strains (WYCCWR 10195=S1-3-7, WYCCWR 10198=S1-4-3 and WYCCWR 10200=S1-5-1) isolated from Northwest China formed a group affiliated to Mesorhizobium based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison. To clarify their species status, multilocus sequence analysis and average nucleotide identity (ANI) values of whole genome sequences between the novel group and the type strains of the related species were further performed. Similarities of 95.7–96.6 % in the concatenated sequences of atpD-recA-glnII and 91.9–93.1 % of ANI values to the closest-related species Mesorhizobium muleiense , Mesorhizobium mediterraneum and Mesorhizobium temperatum demonstrated the novel group a unique genospecies. The most abundant fatty acid in cells of WYCCWR 10195 were C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c (51.4 %), followed by C18 : 1  ω7c 11-methyl (9.5 %) and C16 : 0 (9.3 %). Its genome size was 6.37 Mbp, comprising 6633 predicted genes with a DNA G+C content of 61.9 mol%. The similarities of 99.0–99.8 % for the nodC gene and 98.3–99.44 % for the nifH gene to those of the chickpea rhizobial species and nodulation with Cicer arietinum L. confirmed the strains of the new genospecies as symbiovar ciceri. The weak utilization of most of the tested sugars/organic acids and non-utilization of l(+)-rhamnose, l-cysteine and l-glycine as sole carbon source, tolerance to 1 % (w/v) NaCl, resistance to 5 µg ml chloromycetin and non-hydrolysis of l-tyrosine distinguished the novel group from the related species and supported this group as a novel species, for which the name Mesorhizobium wenxiniae sp. nov. is proposed, with WYCCWR 10195 (=S1-3-7=HAMBI 3692=LMG 30254) as the type strain.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.002770
2018-04-20
2019-12-08
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/ijsem/68/6/1930.html?itemId=/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.002770&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Alexandre A, Brígido C, Laranjo M, Rodrigues S, Oliveira S. Survey of chickpea rhizobia diversity in Portugal reveals the predominance of species distinct from Mesorhizobium ciceri and Mesorhizobium mediterraneum. Microb Ecol 2009;58:930–941 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  2. L'Taief B, Sifi B, Gtari M, Zaman-Allah M, Lachaâl M. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of chickpea rhizobia isolated from different areas of Tunisia. Can J Microbiol 2007;53:427–434 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Laranjo M, Branco C, Soares R, Alho L, Carvalho MD et al. Comparison of chickpea rhizobia isolates from diverse Portuguese natural populations based on symbiotic effectiveness and DNA fingerprint. J Appl Microbiol 2002;92:1043–1050 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Laranjo M, Machado J, Young JP, Oliveira S. High diversity of chickpea Mesorhizobium species isolated in a Portuguese agricultural region. FEMS Microbiol Ecol 2004;48:101–107 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Laranjo M, Rodrigues R, Alho L, Oliveira S. Rhizobia of chickpea from southern Portugal: symbiotic efficiency and genetic diversity. J Appl Microbiol 2001;90:662–667 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Maâtallah J, Berraho EB, Muñoz S, Sanjuan J, Lluch C. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of chickpea rhizobia isolated from different areas of Morocco. J Appl Microbiol 2002;93:531–540 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Ögütçü H, Öf A, Elkoca E, Kantar F. The determination of symbiotic effectiveness of Rhizobium strains isolated from wild chickpeas collected from high altitudes in Erzurum. Turk J Agric For 2008;32:241–248
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Rai R, Dash PK, Mohapatra T, Singh A. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of indigenous rhizobia nodulating chickpea in India. Indian J Exp Biol 2012;50:340–350[PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Zhang JJ, Lou K, Jin X, Mao PH, Wang ET et al. Distinctive Mesorhizobium populations associated with Cicer arietinum L. in alkaline soils of Xinjiang, China. Plant Soil 2012;353:123–134 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Laranjo M, Alexandre A, Rivas R, Velázquez E, Young JP et al. Chickpea rhizobia symbiosis genes are highly conserved across multiple Mesorhizobium species. FEMS Microbiol Ecol 2008;66:391–400 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Nour SM, Fernandez MP, Normand P, Cleyet-Marel JC. Rhizobium ciceri sp. nov., consisting of strains that nodulate chickpeas (Cicer arietinum L.). Int J Syst Bacteriol 1994;44:511–522 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Nour SM, Cleyet-Marel JC, Normand P, Fernandez MP. Genomic heterogeneity of strains nodulating chickpeas (Cicer arietinum L.) and description of Rhizobium mediterraneum sp. nov. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1995;45:640–648 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Rivas R, Laranjo M, Mateos PF, Oliveira S, Martínez-Molina E et al. Strains of Mesorhizobium amorphae and Mesorhizobium tianshanense, carrying symbiotic genes of common chickpea endosymbiotic species, constitute a novel biovar (ciceri) capable of nodulating Cicer arietinum. Lett Appl Microbiol 2007;44:412–418 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Tena W, Wolde-Meskel E, Degefu T, Walley F. Genetic and phenotypic diversity of rhizobia nodulating chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) in soils from southern and central Ethiopia. Can J Microbiol 2017;63:690–707 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Nandwani R, Dudeja SS. Molecular diversity of a native mesorhizobial population of nodulating chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) in Indian soils. J Basic Microbiol 2009;49:463–470 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Zhang J, Yang X, Guo C, de Lajudie P, Singh RP et al. Mesorhizobium muleiense and Mesorhizobium gsp. nov. are symbionts of Cicer arietinum L. in alkaline soils of Gansu, Northwest China. Plant Soil 2017;410:103–112 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Zhang JJ, Liu TY, Chen WF, Wang ET, Sui XH et al. Mesorhizobium muleiense sp. nov., nodulating with Cicer arietinum L. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2012;62:2737–2742 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Vincent JM. A Manual for the Practical Study of Rootnodule Bacteria International Biological Programme (By) Blackwell Scientific: Oxford; 1970
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Tamura K, Stecher G, Peterson D, Filipski A, Kumar S. MEGA6: molecular evolutionary genetics analysis version 6.0. Mol Biol Evol 2013;30:2725–2729 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Tighe SW, de Lajudie P, Dipietro K, Lindström K, Nick G et al. Analysis of cellular fatty acids and phenotypic relationships of Agrobacterium, Bradyrhizobium, Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium and Sinorhizobium species using the Sherlock Microbial Identification System. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2000;50:787–801 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Sasser M. Identification of Bacteria By Gas Chromatography of Cellular Fatty Acids, MIDI Technical Note 101. Newark, DE: MIDI Inc.; 1990
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Luo R, Liu B, Xie Y, Li Z, Huang W et al. SOAPdenovo2: an empirically improved memory-efficient short-read de novo assembler. Gigascience 2012;1:18 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Lee I, Ouk Kim Y, Park SC, Chun J. OrthoANI: An improved algorithm and software for calculating average nucleotide identity. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2016;66:1100–1103 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Wei G, Chen W, Zhu W, Chen C, Young JP et al. Invasive Robinia pseudoacacia in China is nodulated by Mesorhizobium and Sinorhizobium species that share similar nodulation genes with native American symbionts. FEMS Microbiol Ecol 2009;68:320–328 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Ohta H, Hattori T. Agromonas oligotrophica gen. nov., sp. nov., a nitrogen-fixing oligotrophic bacterium. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 1983;49:429–446[PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Smibert R, Krieg N. Phenotypic characterization. In Gerhardt P, Murray R, Wood W, Krieg N. (editors) Methods for General and Molecular Bacteriology Washington, DC: American Society for Microbiology; 1994; pp.607–654
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Vinuesa P, Silva C, Werner D, Martínez-Romero E. Population genetics and phylogenetic inference in bacterial molecular systematics: the roles of migration and recombination in Bradyrhizobium species cohesion and delineation. Mol Phylogenet Evol 2005;34:29–54 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Martens M, Dawyndt P, Coopman R, Gillis M, de Vos P et al. Advantages of multilocus sequence analysis for taxonomic studies: a case study using 10 housekeeping genes in the genus Ensifer (including former Sinorhizobium). Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2008;58:200–214 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Vinuesa P, Silva C, Lorite MJ, Izaguirre-Mayoral ML, Bedmar EJ et al. Molecular systematics of rhizobia based on maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenies inferred from rrs, atpD, recA and nifH sequences, and their use in the classification of Sesbania microsymbionts from Venezuelan wetlands. Syst Appl Microbiol 2005;28:702–716 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Goris J, Konstantinidis KT, Klappenbach JA, Coenye T, Vandamme P et al. DNA-DNA hybridization values and their relationship to whole-genome sequence similarities. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2007;57:81–91 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Richter M, Rosselló-Móra R, Oliver Glöckner F, Peplies J. JSpeciesWS: a web server for prokaryotic species circumscription based on pairwise genome comparison. Bioinformatics 2016;32:929–931 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Graham PH, Sadowsky MJ, Keyser HH, Barnet YM, Bradley RS et al. Proposed minimal standards for the description of new genera and species of root- and stem-nodulating bacteria. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1991;41:582–587 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Wayne LG, Diaz GA. Intrinsic catalase dot blot immunoassay for identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium, and Mycobacterium intracellulare. J Clin Microbiol 1987;25:1687–1690[PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.002770
Loading
/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.002770
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Supplements

Supplementary File 1

PDF

Most Cited This Month

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error