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Abstract

Strain SYSU D8009 was isolated from a desert sample collected from Saudi Arabia. The taxonomic position of the isolate was investigated by a polyphasic approach. The novel isolate was Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, aerobic and non-spore-forming. It was able to grow at 4–45 °C and pH 4.0–8.0, and exhibited NaCl tolerance of up to 1.5 % (w/v). Strain SYSU D8009 shared the closest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with members of the family Acetobacteraceae , with a value of less than 96.0 %. In the phylogenetic dendrograms, the strain clustered with the genera Paracraurococcus , Craurococcus and Crenalkalicoccus within the family Acetobacteraceae but with a distinct lineage, thereby demonstrating that the strain should be classified within the family Acetobacteraceae . The respiratory ubiquinone was found to be Q-10. The polar lipids of the strain comprised diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and four unidentified aminolipids. The predominant cellular fatty acids were summed feature 8 (C1 8 : 1ω7c and/or C1 8 : 1ω6c) and C16 : 0. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain SYSU D8009 was determined to be 71.6 mol%. Based on the results of the phylogenetic analyses and differences in the physiological and biochemical characteristics, strain SYSU D8009 merits representation of a novel species of a new genus within the family Acetobacteraceae , for which the name Siccirubricoccus deserti gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Siccirubricoccus deserti sp. nov. is SYSU D8009 (=CGMCC 1.15936=KCTC 62088).

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2017-10-06
2019-10-22
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