1887

Abstract

A Gram-staining-negative, non-motile and rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain h337, was isolated from an arable soil sample of a tobacco field in Kunming, south-west China. The cells showed oxidase-positive and catalase-positive reactions. Growth was observed at 10–35 °C, at pH 6.0–9.0 and in the presence of up to 3 % (w/v) NaCl, with optimal growth at 30 °C, pH 7.0 and with 1–2 % (w/v) NaCl. The predominant isoprenoid quinone was MK-7. The major fatty acids were identified as iso-C15 : 0, iso-C17 : 0 3-OH, summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c) and summed feature 4 (iso-C17 : 1 I and/or anteiso-C17 : 1 B). The cellular polar lipids contained phosphatidylethanolamine, sphingophospholipid, four unidentified phospholipids, five unidentified lipids and three unidentified aminophospholipids. The genomic DNA G+C content was 41.5 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain h337 should be assigned to the genus Sphingobacterium . 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity analysis showed that strain h337 was most closely related to ‘ Sphingobacterium yamdrokense ’ 3-0-1 (98.8 %) and Sphingobacterium yanglingense CCNWSP36-1 (98.5 %) and shared less than 97 % similarity with other species of the genus Sphingobacterium . DNA–DNA hybridization data indicated that the isolate represented a novel genomic species belonging to the genus Sphingobacterium . The characteristics determined in this polyphasic taxonomic study indicated that strain h337 represents a novel species of the genus Sphingobacterium , for which the name Sphingobacterium tabacisoli sp. nov. (type strain h337=KCTC 52298=CCTCC AB 2017155) is proposed.

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2017-10-06
2019-10-20
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