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Abstract

Three gammaproteobacterial methanotrophic strains (73a, 175 and 114) were isolated from stems of rice plants. All strains are Gram-negative, motile and grow on methane or methanol as sole carbon sources. They oxidize methane using the particulate methane monooxygenase. Strains 114 and 175 possess additionally a soluble methane monooxygenase. All strains contain significant amounts of the cellular fatty acids C16 : 0, C16 : 1ω6c and C16 : 1ω7c, typical for type Ib methanotrophs. Characteristic for strains 114 and 175 are high amounts of C14 : 0 and C16 : 1ω6c , while strain 73a contains high quantities of C16 : 1ω5c. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses showed that strains 114 and 175 are most closely related to Methylomagnum ishizawai (≥99.6 % sequence identity). Strain 73a is representing a new genus within the family Methylococcaceae , most closely related to Methylococcus capsulatus (94.3 % sequence identity). Phylogenetic analysis of the PmoA sequence indicates that strain 73a represents rice paddy cluster I (RPCI), which has almost exclusively been detected in rice ecosystems. The G+C content of strain 73a is 61.0 mol%, while strains 114 and 175 have a G+C content of 63.3 mol%. Strain 73a (=LMG 29185, =VKM B-2986) represents the type strain of a novel species and genus, for which the name Methyloterricola oryzae gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed and a description is provided. Strains 175 (=LMG 28717, VKM B-2989) and 114 are members of the species Methylomagnum ishizawai . This genus was so far only represented by one isolate, so an amended description of the species is given.

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2017-10-06
2019-10-14
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