1887

Abstract

The bacterial strain 2-92, isolated from a field plot under long-term (>40 years) mineral fertilization, exhibited in vitro antagonistic properties against fungal pathogens. A polyphasic approach was undertaken to verify its taxonomic status. Strain 2-92 was Gram-reaction-negative, aerobic, non-spore-forming, motile by one or more flagella, and oxidase-, catalase- and urease-positive. The optimal growth temperature of strain 2-92 was 30 °C. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis demonstrated that the strain is related to species of the genus Pseudomonas . Phylogenetic analysis of six housekeeping genes (dna A, gyr B, rec A, rec F, rpo B and rpo D) revealed that strain 2-92 clustered as a distinct and well separated lineage with Pseudomonas simiae as the most closely related species. Polar lipid and fatty acid compositions corroborated the taxonomic position of strain 2-92 in the genus Pseudomonas . Phenotypic characteristics from carbon utilization tests could be used to differentiate strain 2-92 from closely related species of the genus Pseudomonas . DNA–DNA hybridization values (wet laboratory and genome-based) and average nucleotide identity data confirmed that this strain represents a novel species. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, it is concluded that this strain represents a separate novel species for which the name Pseudomonas canadensis sp. nov. is proposed, with type strain 2-92 (=LMG 28499=DOAB 798). The DNA G+C content is 60.30 mol%.

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2017-05-05
2019-10-18
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