1887

Abstract

Two isolates of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria, strains Sph1 and Sph2, were obtained from cold methane seeps in a floodplain of the river Mukhrinskaya, Irtysh basin, West Siberia. Another morphologically and phenotypically similar methanotroph, strain OZ2, was isolated from a sediment of a subarctic freshwater lake, Archangelsk region, northern Russia. Cells of these three strains were Gram-stain-negative, light-pink-pigmented, non-motile, encapsulated, large cocci that contained an intracytoplasmic membrane system typical of type I methanotrophs. They possessed a particulate methane monooxygenase enzyme and utilized only methane and methanol. Strains Sph1, Sph2 and OZ2 were able to grow at a pH range of 4.0–8.9 (optimum at pH 6.0–7.0) and at temperatures between 2 and 36 °C. Although their temperature optimum was at 20–25 °C, these methanotrophs grew well at lower temperatures, down to 4 °C. The major cellular fatty acids were Cω5, Cω6, Cω7, Cω8, C and C; the DNA G+C content was 51.4–51.9 mol%. Strains Sph1, Sph2 and OZ2 displayed nearly identical (99.1–99.7 % similarity) 16S rRNA gene sequences and belonged to the family of the class . The most closely related organism was HT12 (96.0–96.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity and 90 % sequence similarity). The novel isolates, however, differed from HT12 by cell morphology, pigmentation, absence of soluble methane monooxygenase, more active growth at low temperatures, growth over a broader pH range and higher DNA G+C content. On the basis of these differences, we propose a novel species, sp. nov., to accommodate these methanotrophs. Strain Sph1 (=LMG 29227=VKM B-3018) is the type strain.

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2016-06-10
2020-09-21
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