1887

Abstract

The sporulating, filamentous soil bacterium ATCC 10712 differentiates under submerged and surface growth conditions. In order to lay a solid foundation for the study of development-associated division for this organism, a congenic set of mutants was isolated, individually deleted for a gene encoding either a cytoplasmic (i.e. ) or core inner membrane (i.e. , , , , ) component of the divisome. While mutants are completely blocked for division, single mutants in the other core divisome genes resulted in partial, yet similar, blocks in sporulation septum formation. Double and triple mutants for core divisome membrane components displayed phenotypes that were similar to those of the single mutants, demonstrating that the phenotypes were not synergistic. Division in this organism is still partially functional without multiple core divisome proteins, suggesting that perhaps other unknown lineage-specific proteins perform redundant functions. In addition, by isolating an mutant with an altered −10 region, the conserved developmentally controlled promoter was also shown to be required for sporulation-associated division. Finally, microscopic observation of FtsZ-YFP dynamics in the different mutant backgrounds led to the conclusion that the initial assembly of regular Z rings does not per se require the tested divisome membrane proteins, but the stability of Z rings is dependent on the divisome membrane components tested. The observation is consistent with the interpretation that Z ring instability likely results from and further contributes to the observed defects in sporulation septation in mutants lacking core divisome proteins.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • BeerChakra Sen , Royal Physiographic Society of Lund
  • BeerChakra Sen , Sven och Lilly Lawskis fond för naturvetenskaplig forskning, Stiftelsen Jörgen Lindströms stipendiefond
  • StuartCantlay , Bayer School of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Duquesne University
  • KlasFlärdh , Wenner-Gren guest rersearcher grant
  • KlasFlärdh , Swedish Research Council , (Award 621-2010-4463)
  • JosephR. McCormick , National Institutes of Health , (Award GM096268)
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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.001015
2021-01-05
2021-02-26
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