1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-positive bacterium capable of resisting 5.0 mM glufosinate, designated strain YX-27, was isolated from a sludge sample collected from a factory in Wuxi, Jiangsu, PR China. Cells were rod-shaped, facultatively anaerobic, endospore-forming, and motile by peritrichous flagella. Growth was observed at 15–42 °C (optimum at 30 °C), pH 4.0–8.0 (optimum pH 7.0–7.5) and with 0–2.5% NaCl (w/v; optimum, 0.5 %). Strain YX-27 could tolerate up to 6.0 mM glufosinate. Strain YX-27 showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to TB2019 (96.17 %), followed by DSM 1539 (96.15 %), S27 (96.04 %), 7124 (96.02 %) and DSM 14472 (95.87 %). The phylogenetic tree based on genome and 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain YX-27 was clustered in the genus but formed a separate clade. The genome size of YX-27 was 5.22 Mb with a G+C content of 57.5 mol%. The average nucleotide identity and digital DNA–DNA hybridization values between the genomes of strain YX-27 and 12 closely related type strains ranged from 70.8 to 74.8% and 19.8 to 23.0 %, respectively. The major cellular fatty acids were C, anteiso-C and iso-C. The major polar lipids were one diphosphatidylglycerol, one phosphatidylethanolamine, one phosphatidylglycerol, one phospholipid, four aminophospholipids and four unidentified lipids. The predominant respiratory quinone was MK-7. Based on phylogenetic, genomic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic data, strain YX-27 was considered to represent a novel species for which the name sp. nov. is proposed, with YX-27 (=MCCC 1K08803= KCTC 43611) as the type strain.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Science and Technology Support Program of Jiangsu Province (Award BM2022019)
    • Principle Award Recipient: JianHe
  • Jiangsu Provincial Agricultural Science and Technology Independent Innovation Fund (Award CX(22)3023)
    • Principle Award Recipient: JianHe
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2024-02-02
2024-02-21
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