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Abstract

Coral reef ecosystems are facing decline due to climate change, overfishing, habitat destruction and pollution. Bacteria play an essential role in maintaining the stability of coral reef ecosystems, influencing the well-being and fitness of coral hosts. The exploitation of coral probiotics has become an urgent issue. A short-rod shaped aerobic bacterium, designated NTR19, was isolated in a healthy coral from Daya Bay, Shenzhen, PR China. Its cells were Gram-negative, motile with a polar flagellum. The activities of catalase and oxidase were positive. Strain NTR19 grew at 10–41 °C (optimum, 28 °C), with NaCl concentrations of 0–4 % (w/v; optimum, 0.5 %) and at pH 5.0–9.5 (optimum, pH 7.0–7.5). The predominant fatty acids (>10 %) were summed feature 8 (57.6 %), C cyclo ω8 (12.6 %) and C (12.0 %). The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phospholipid and phosphatidylcholine. The major respiratory quinone was Q-10. The draft genome was 4.68 Mbp with 61.2 mol% DNA G+C content. In total, 4477 coding sequences were annotated and there were 64 RNA genes. The average nucleotide identity (ANI) and average amino acid identity (AAI) values between strain NTR19 and the related species were 78.23–79.70% and 80.26–80.50 %, respectively. This strain encoded many proteins for the activities of catalase and oxidase in the genome. Strain NTR19 was clearly distinct from its closest neighbours ACCC 05753 and ACCC 11238 with the 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of 96.86 and 96.36 %, respectively. The results of phylogenetic analysis, as well as ANI and AAI values, revealed that strain NTR19 belongs to and was distinct from other species of this genus. The physiological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic characteristics also supported the species novelty of strain NTR19. Thus, strain NTR19 is considered to be classified as a novel species in the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NTR19 (=JCM 35342=MCCC 1K07226).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Guangdong Key Area R & D Program Project (Award 2020B1111030002)
    • Principle Award Recipient: BaohuaXiao
  • Shenzhen Science and Technology R&D Fund (Award KCXFZ20211020165547011)
    • Principle Award Recipient: BaohuaXiao
  • Shenzhen Science and Technology R&D Fund (Award JCYJ20200109144803833)
    • Principle Award Recipient: BaohuaXiao
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2023-09-26
2024-07-23
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