1887

Abstract

A novel bacterial strain, designated as WHS-Z9, was isolated from marine sponge sp. collected from Weihai (37° 25′ N, 121° 58′ E), Shandong Province, PR China. Cells of strain WHS-Z9 were Gram-stain-positive, non-spore-forming, non-motile, short-rod-shaped and light yellow-pigmented. The strain could grow at 10–40 °C (optimum, 20 °C), pH 4.5–9.5 (optimum, pH 8.5) and 2–14 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 4 %). The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain WHS-Z9 showed 98.7  % similarity to that of NBRC 14811, 98.5  % to FXJ8.269 and 98.4 % to BBH7. The phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain WHS-Z9 was clustered with o2. The whole genome of WHS-Z9 was approximately 4 217 721 bp in size with a G+C content of 65.2  %. The average nucleotide identity (ANI) and digital DNA–DNA hybridization (dDDH) values among WHS-Z9 and other type strains were 83.3–85.5 % (ANI based on ), 86.4–87.9  % (ANI based on MUMmer) and 41.9–57.5 % (dDDH). Percentage of conserved protein values between the genomes of strain WHS-Z9 and members of genera were 76.8–82.9 %, while the average amino acid identity (AAI) values were 83.7–87.0  %. The dDDH, ANI, AAI and POCP values were below the standard cut-off criteria for the delineation of bacterial species. The sole respiratory quinone in strain WHS-Z9 was MK-8(H), and the predominant fatty acids were anteiso-C and anteiso-C. The major polar lipids of WHS-Z9 consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol and glycolipid. The diagnostic cell-wall diamino acid of strain WHS-Z9 was -diaminopimelic acid. Based on the data obtained in this study, strain WHS-Z9 (=MCCC 1K07845=KCTC 49848) should be classified as the type strain of a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Key Research and Development Program of China (Award 2018YFA0901901)
    • Principle Award Recipient: ZhiyongLi
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2023-05-15
2024-06-25
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