1887

Abstract

A polyphasic approach was used to describe strain RB6PN25, an actinobacterium isolated from peat swamp forest soil in Rayong Province, Thailand. The strain was a Gram-stain-positive and filamentous bacterium that contained -diaminopimelic acid, mannose and ribose in whole-cell hydrolysates. MK-9(H) was the major menaquinone. The major fatty acids were -C, -C and -C. The polar lipid profile consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, two unidentified glycophospholipids, two unidentified aminolipids and an unidentified phospholipid. The 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis indicated that it was most closely related to DSM 42083 (97.6 %) and TBRC 1999 (97.4 %). Strain RB6PN25 exhibited low average nucleotide identity and digital DNA–DNA hybridization values with DSM 42083 (78.6 %, 23.2 %) and TBRC 1999 (76.0 %, 22.6 %). The DNA G+C content of strain RB6PN25 was 69.9%. The results of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, genotypic and phylogenetic analyses reveal that strain RB6PN25 represents a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is RB6PN25 (=TBRC 14819=NBRC 115204).

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/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.005665
2022-12-20
2024-07-25
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