1887

Abstract

Bacterial strain H33 was isolated from tobacco plant soil and was characterized using a polyphasic taxonomy approach. Strain H33 was a Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, non-motile and strictly aerobic bacterium. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and coding sequences of the up-to-date bacterial core gene set (92 protein clusters) indicated that H33 belongs to the genus . Strain H33 showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to NL9 (97.2%) and showed 72.3–80.6 % average nucleotide identity and 19.7–29.2 % digital DNA–DNA hybridization identity with the strains of other species of the genus . Strain H33 grew optimally at 30°C, pH 7 and could tolerate 0.5 % (w/v) NaCl. The isoprenoid quinones were ubiquinone-9 (64.1%) and ubiquinone-10 (35.9%). Spermidine was the major polyamine. The major fatty acids of H33 were summed feature 8 (C 7 and/or C 6). The polar lipid profile consisted of a mixture of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylmethylethanolamine, sphingoglycolipid, two unidentified lipids, two unidentified glycolipids, two unidentified aminoglycolipids and an unidentified phospholipid. The genomic DNA G+C content of H33 was 64.9 mol%. Based on the phylogenetic and phenotypic data, H33 was considered a representative of a novel species in the genus . We propose the name sp. nov., with H33 (=CCTCC AB 2022073=LMG 32569) as the type strain.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award 41967023)
    • Principle Award Recipient: MingshunLi
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/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.005529
2023-04-06
2024-02-21
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