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Abstract

A Gram-stain-positive coccus was isolated from the blood of a paediatric patient suffering from gastroenteritis. The taxonomic position of this catalase-positive, non-motile, non-spore-forming facultative anaerobe designated as strain MKL-02 was investigated using a polyphasic approach. Colonies grown on tryptic soy agar with 10 % sheep blood were circular, creamy yellow, and convex. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene and whole-genome sequences revealed that this strain was most closely related to CCUG 47306 within the cluster of the genus . Average nucleotide identity and digital DNA–DNA hybridization values between strain MKL-02 and DSM 15745, DSM 25571 and DSM 22760 were 89.5 and 37.0 %, 79.6 and 22.4 %, and 75.9 and 21.0 %, respectively. The genomic size of strain MKL-02 was 3 423 857 bp with a 72.7 mol% G+C content. Growth was observed at 10–45 °C (optimum, 37–40 °C) and pH 6.0–10.0 (optimum, pH 7.0), in the presence of 0–10 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 0.5 %). Cells of strain MKL-02 were non-motile cocci and 0.50–0.60 µm long, as determined by transmission electron microscopy. The strain was catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. The major fatty acid type (>10 % of total) was C. The polar lipid profile consisted of two unidentified phospholipids, three unidentified lipids and an unidentified aminophospholipid. The strain contained MK-8 (H) as the predominant menaquinone. Based on phylogenetic and phenotypic considerations, it is proposed that strain MKL-02 be classified as a new species, named sp. nov. The type strain is MKL-02 (=NCCP 16967=JCM 34624).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • This research was also supported by the Chung-Ang University Research Grants in 2021 (Award 2021)
    • Principle Award Recipient: OhJoo Kweon
  • This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MSIT) (Award No.2020R1A5A1018052)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Mi-KyungLee
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2022-05-17
2022-07-06
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