1887

Abstract

A novel obligate anaerobic organism, designated DONG20-135, was isolated from human faeces collected in Beijing, PR China. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, non-motile and non-spore-forming. Growth occurred at 25‒45 °C (optimum, 30‒35 °C), a pH range of 6–9 (optimum, pH 8) and in the presence of 0‒3.5 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 0.5‒1.5 %). The major fatty acids were C, C 9 and C, the polar lipid profile consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, four glycolipids, six aminolipids, three aminophospholipids and four unidentified lipids. No respiratory quinones were detected. The cell-wall peptidoglycan of the strain was A1 type, containing -diaminopimelic acid. The 16S rRNA gene sequences shared a lower identity (<92.7 % similarity) with the described species. The phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and the protein-concatamer tree showed that strain DONG20-135 formed a distinct lineage within the family . The genomic DNA G + C content was 42.2 mol%. Based on the results of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genomic analyses, strain DONG20-135 represents a novel genus of the family , for which the name gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed (=KCTC 15868=CGMCC 1.17357).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • the National Science and Technology Fundamental Resources Investigation Program of China (Award 2021FY100900)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Ping-HuaQu
  • the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award 31970863)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Yu-JingBi
  • the National Natural Science Foundation for Key Programs of China (Award 81790632)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Yu-JingBi
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2022-05-13
2022-05-27
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