1887

Abstract

Three strains of members of the family , which can inhibit the growth of some Gram-stain-positive strains, designated M4U3P1, HD4P25 and RD4P76, were isolated from halophytes in Baotou, Inner Mongolia, PR China. A phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene and the whole genome sequences revealed that HD4P25 clustered with YIM 93174 with a similarity of 98.4 %, and RD4P76 shared the highest similarity of 16S rRNA gene with SA4 (97.5 %). M4U3P1 clustered with strains of genera and based on whole-genome sequence analyses, but its 16S rRNA gene had the highest similarity to '' EGI 80668 (96.1 %). The average nucleotide’s identity by (ANIb) and digital DNA–DNA hybridization (dDDH) values of the three isolated strains to their close relatives were well below the threshold value for identifying a novel species.On the basis of the phylogenetic, physiological and phenotypic results, gen. nov., sp. nov. [type strain M4U3P1 (=CGMCC 1.17076=JCM 33851)] sp. nov. [type strain HD4P25 (=CGMCC 1.18651 =JCM 34524)] and sp. nov. [type strain RD4P76 (=CGMCC 1.18659=JCM 34525)] were proposed, respectively. All three species are ubiquitous in the bulk saline–alkaline soils, but only the species represented by strain RD4P76 was widely distributed in the rhizosphere soil, the above-ground part and the roots of . The species represented by M4U3P1 can be detected in the roots of , and rarely detected in the above-ground parts of . The species represented by HD4P25 was rarely detected in the interior of . The three strains could inhibit some of the Gram-stain-positive bacteria (i.e. members of the genera , and ) in the saline–alkali soil. A genomic analysis of these three strains revealed that they can synthesize different antagonistic compounds, such as aminobenzoate and bacitracin or subtilisin.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award 31960020)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Ji-QuanSun
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2022-05-13
2022-05-29
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