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Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic and motile bacterial strain, designated CJ34, was isolated from Han River water in the Republic of Korea. Strain CJ34 grew optimally on tryptic soy agar at 30 °C and pH 7.0 in the absence of NaCl. Results of phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain CJ34 belonged to the genus within the family and was most closely related to ATCC 11996 and DSM 17888 (both 98.63 % similarity). The average nucleotide identity values between strain CJ34 and two closely related type strains ATCC 11996 and DSM 17888 were 82.77 and 82.73 %, respectively. The major isoprenoid quinone of strain CJ34 was ubiquinone Q-8. The major cellular fatty acids of strain CJ34 were C, C 6 and/or C 7c and C 6 and/or C 7. The predominant polar lipids of strain CJ34 were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and an unidentified aminophospholipid. Whole genome sequencing revealed that strain CJ34 had a genome of 4.9 Mbp and the G+C content of the genomic DNA was 59.73 mol%. On the basis of the results of this polyphasic taxonomy study, strain CJ34 represents a novel species in the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CJ34 (=KACC 22237=JCM 34454).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Chung-Ang University
    • Principle Award Recipient: Eun-HeePark
  • Ministry of Environment (Award 2016001350004)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Chang-JunCha
  • National Institute of Biological Resources (Award NIBR201902203)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Chang-JunCha
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2022-03-22
2024-07-22
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