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Abstract

Strain NCCP-691 was isolated from a soil sample collected from an arid soil in Karak, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. Phenotypically, the cells were Gram-stain-negative, aerobic and motile rods. The organism was able to grow between 20–40 °C (optimum at 30–37 °C), at pH 5.5–8.0 (optimum at pH 7.0–7.2) and tolerated 0–1.5% NaCl (w/v) (optimum at 0–0.5). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain NCCP-691 formed a distinct phylogenetic clade with , . , . and . (having sequence similarities of 99.0; 98.1; 98.0 and 97.7% respectively). Phylogenetic analyses based on the whole genome sequences confirmed that strain NCCP-691 should be affiliated to the genus . The average nucleotide identity values compared to other species of were below 95–96 % and digital DNA–DNA hybridization values were less than 70 %. Chemotaxonomic analyses showed that the strain had ubiquinone-8, as the only respiratory quinine. The major cellular fatty acids were summed feature 3 (C ω 7/C ω 6 c, 35.9 %), summed feature 8 (C ω 7/C ω 6 c, 26.9 %) and C (22.9 %) and the polar lipid profile was composed of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. The genomic DNA G+C content was 65.5 mol% (from draft genome). Genome analyses showed that strain NCCP-691 had terpene and arylpolyene biosynthetic genes clusters and genes related to resistance against heavy metals. Based on phylogenetic analyses, phenotypic features and genomic comparison, it is proposed that strain NCCP-691 is a novel species of the genus and the name sp. nov. is proposed. Type strain is NCCP-691 (=KCTC 52721=CGMCC 1.13600).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences President’s International Fellowship Initiative (Award 2020VBA0020)
    • Principle Award Recipient: IftikharAhmed
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award 32000084)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Yong-HongLiu
  • Innovative Research Group Project of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award 32061143043)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Wen-JunLi
  • Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, regional coordinated Innovation Project and Shanghai Cooperation Organization Science and Technology Partnership Program (Award 2020E01047)
    • Principle Award Recipient: LiLi
  • Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, regional coordinated Innovation Project and Shanghai Cooperation Organization Science and Technology Partnership Program (Award 2021E01018)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Wen-JunLi
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2022-02-09
2022-07-06
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