1887

Abstract

Fourteen strains of isolated from scab lesions on potato are described as members of a novel species based on genetic distance, morphological observation and biochemical analyses. Morphological and biochemical characteristics of these strains are distinct from other described phytopathogenic species. Strain NE06-02D has white aerial mycelium and grey, cylindrical, smooth spores on rectus-flexibilis spore chains. Members of this species group can utilize most of the International Project sugars, utilize melibiose and trehalose, produce melanin, grow on 6–7 % NaCl and pH 5–5.5 media, and are susceptible to oleandomycin (100 µg ml), streptomycin (20 µg ml) and penicillin G (30 µg ml). Though the 16S rRNA gene sequences from several members of this novel species are identical to the 16S rRNA gene sequence, whole-genome average nucleotide identity and multi-locus sequence analysis confirm that the strains are members of a novel species. Strains belonging to this novel species have been isolated from the United States, Egypt and China with the earliest known members being isolated in 1961 from common scab lesions of potato in both California, USA, and Maine, USA. The name sp. nov. is proposed for strain NE06-02D (=DSM111602=ATCC TSD-236) and the other members of this novel species group.

Keyword(s): common scab , genomics , potato and Streptomyces
Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Agricultural Research Service (Award 8042-21000-283)
    • Principle Award Recipient: NotApplicable
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2022-01-27
2024-07-19
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