1887

Abstract

Two recently reported bacterial strains that were identified as the dominant caproate-producing bacteria in pit clay, were further characterized to determine their phylogeny and taxonomy. The two strains, designated as LBM19010 and JNU-WLY1368, were short rod-shaped, Gram-stain-positive, non-motile and strictly anaerobic. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strains LBM19010 and JNU-WLY1368 shared a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 99.93 % and belonged to a recent proposed genus in the family . The proposed type strain, LBM19010, showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to LBM18003 (96.34%), followed by JCM 30532 (94.14 %). The pairwise average nucleotide identity and average amino acid identity values between strains LBM19010 and LBM18003 were 74.84 and 76.18 %, respectively. Growth of strain LBM19010 occurred at pH 4.5–7.5 (optimum, pH 5.0–5.5), 20–40 °C (optimum, 35 °C) and with 0–1 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 0 %). Strains LBM19010 and JNU-WLY1368 were both able to ferment several hexoses, disaccharides, starch and lactate but not pentoses. Caproate and butyrate were the major end-products from glucose. The predominant cellular fatty acids (>10 %) of strain LBM19010 were C (56.3 %), C DMA (19.5 %) and C (14.9 %). The identified polar lipids of strain LBM19010 were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, three unidentified phospholipids and nine unidentified glycolipids. Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic evidence, strains LBM19010 and JNU-WLY1368 belong to a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LBM19010 (=GDMCC 1.1627=JCM 33782).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Postgraduate Research & Practice Innovation Program of Jiangsu Province (Award KYCX18_1795)
    • Principle Award Recipient: HuilinWang
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award 31530055)
    • Principle Award Recipient: YanXu
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award 21706097)
    • Principle Award Recipient: CongRen
  • Open Foundation from the Key Light-industry Laboratory of Solid-state Fermentation for Strong Aroma-type Liquor (Award 2017JJ019)
    • Principle Award Recipient: CongRen
  • Chinese Baijiu Industrial Technology Innovation Strategic Alliance project (Award 2018-3)
    • Principle Award Recipient: YanXu
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2022-01-27
2022-05-18
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