1887

Abstract

is a symbiotic group of bacteria associated with entomopathogenic nematodes of the family Steinernematidae. Although the described species list is extensive, not all their symbiotic bacteria have been identified. One single motile, Gram-negative and non-spore-forming rod-shaped symbiotic bacterium, strain VLS, was isolated from the entomopathogenic nematode . Analyses of the 16S rRNA gene determined that the VLS isolate belongs to the genus , and its closest related species is DSM 16338 (98.2 %). Deeper analyses using the whole genome for phylogenetic reconstruction indicate that VLS exhibits a unique clade in the genus. Genomic comparisons considering digital DNA–DNA hybridization (dDDH) values confirms this result, showing that the VLS values are distant enough from the 70 % threshold suggested for new species, sharing 30.7, 30.5 and 30.3 % dDDH with MCB, DSM 18168 and DSM 18168, respectively, as the closest species. Detailed physiological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic tests of the VLS isolate reveal consistent differences from previously described species. Phylogenetic, physiological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic approaches show that VLS represents a new species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. (type strain VLS=CCCT 20.04=DSM 111583) is proposed.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • agencia nacional de investigación y desarrollo (anid), cl (Award 2021-21210687)
    • Principle Award Recipient: CarlosCastaneda-Alvarez
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2021-12-13
2022-01-27
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