1887

Abstract

Harmful algal blooms caused by result in enormous economic damage to the aquaculture industry. Biological control methods have attracted wide attention due to their environmental-friendliness. In this study, a novel algicidal bacterium, designated strain M26A2M, was determined for its taxonomic position and was evaluated for its potential to mitigate blooms. Strain M26A2M exhibited the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the type strains of (97.3%), (97.2%), (96.8%) and (96.4%) in the family . The predominant fatty acids were C 3-OH and summed feature 8 (comprising C 7 and/or C 6). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, one unidentified aminolipid and three unidentified lipids. Q-10 was the respiratory quinone. Strain M26A2M exerted significant algicidal activity against cells by destroying the membrane integrity and the photosynthetic system. Our findings suggest that strain M26A2M shows a high potential to control outbreaks of . Based on the polyphasic characterization, strain M26A2M is considered to represent a novel species within a novel genus of the family , for which the name gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is M26A2M (=KCTC 82083=JCM 34119).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (Award 2016M1A5A1027453)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Hee-MockOh
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2021-11-30
2022-01-29
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