1887

Abstract

Strain TUM18999 was isolated from the skin of a patient with burn wounds in Japan. The strain was successfully cultured at 20–42 °C (optimum, 30–35 °C) in 1.0–4.0% NaCl (w/v) and at pH 5.5–9.5, optimum pH 5.5–8.5. The phylogenetic tree reconstructed using 16S rRNA, , and gene sequences indicated that strain TUM18999 is closely related to MCC10330. Although the partial 16S rRNA gene sequence (1412 bp) of TUM18999 exhibits high similarity to those of NBRC 14159 (99.08 %) and MCC10330 (98.51 %), multi-locus sequence analysis using 16S rRNA, , and genes reveals a clear distinction between TUM18999 and other species. In addition, an average nucleotide identity >90 % was not observed in the group. Moreover, TUM18999 and can be distinguished based on the minimum inhibitory concentration for carbapenem. Meanwhile, the cellular fatty acids are enriched with C 7/C 6 (34.35 %), C 7/C 6 (24.22 %), C (19.79 %) and C (8.25 %). Based on this evidence, strain TUM18999 can be defined as representing a novel species, with the proposed name sp. nov. The type strain is TUM18999 (GTC 22698=NCTC 14580).

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2021-11-11
2024-03-05
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