1887

Abstract

An obligately anaerobic bacterial strain (CTTW) belonging to the family within the class was isolated from an anoxic soil sample subjected to biological or reductive soil disinfestation. Cells of the strain were Gram-stain-positive, short rods with peritrichous flagella. The strain was saccharolytic and decomposed polysaccharides, chitin, xylan and β-1,3-glucan. Strain CTTW decomposed cell biomass and cell-wall preparations of an ascomycete plant pathogen, f. sp. . The strain produced acetate, ethanol, H and CO as fermentation products from the utilized substrates. The major cellular fatty acids of the strain were C ω7 dimethylacetal (DMA), C DMA and C ω7 DMA. The closely related species of strain CTTW based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences were species in the genus with sequence similarities of 95.2–97.6 %. Results of genome analyses of strain CTTW indicated that the genome size of the strain was 5.62 Mb and the genomic DNA G+C content was 38.3 mol%. Six 16S rRNA genes with five different sequences from each other were found in the genome. Strain CTTW had genes encoding chitinase, xylanase, cellulase, β-glucosidase and nitrogenase as characteristic genes in the genome. Homologous genes encoding these proteins were found in the genomes of the related species, but the genomic and phenotypic properties of strain CTTW were distinct from them. Based on the phylogenetic, genomic and phenotypic analyses, the name sp. nov., in the family is proposed for strain CTTW (=NBRC 112102=DSM 110036).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (Award 27016C)
    • Principle Award Recipient: UekiAtsuko
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2021-09-13
2021-09-24
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