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Abstract

A novel Gram-stain-negative, short rod-shaped, facultatively anaerobic, non-motile, non-gliding, oxidase-positive and catalase-negative bacterium, designated ML27, was isolated from oyster homogenate in Rushan, Weihai, PR China. Growth occurred at 20–33 °C (optimum, 30 °C), at pH 7.0–9.0 (optimum, pH 7.5–8.0) and in the presence of 1–6 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 3 %). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain ML27 was 90.7 % similar to DSM 18249, 89.2 % to JCM 1478 and 88.2 % to DSM 8339; similarities to other species were less than 90 %. The average amino acid identity between strain ML27, JCM 1478, DSM 18249, DSM 8339 and ATCC 25549 were 46.23, 45.86, 45.54 and 45.84 %, respectively. Phylogenomic tree and phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolate formed a novel family-level clade in the order . The sole respiratory quinone was ubiquinone-7 (Q-7). The dominant cellular fatty acids were summed feature 8 (C ω7/C ω6; 46.3 %), C (17.8 %) and summed feature 3 (C ω7/C ω6; 13.5 %). The DNA G+C content of strain ML27 was 45.6 mol%. Polar lipids included phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol and one unidentified lipid. Comparative analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences, genomic distinctiveness and characterization indicated that strain ML27 represents a novel species of a new genus within a novel family of the order , for which the name gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of is ML27 (=MCCC 1H00372=KCTC 72155). In addition, a novel family, fam. nov., is proposed to accommodate the genus .

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Science and Technology Fundamental Resources Investigation Program of China (Award 2019FY100700)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Zong-JunDu
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award 32070002, 31770002)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Zong-JunDu
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2021-07-06
2021-08-02
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