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Abstract

Two Gram-stain-negative, moderately halophilic, non-motile, rod-shaped, pale yellow, and aerobic strains, designated WDS1C4 and WDS4C29, were isolated from a marine solar saltern in Weihai, Shandong Province, PR China. Growth of strain WDS1C4 occurred at 10–45 °C (optimum, 37 °C), with 4–16 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 8 %) and at pH 6.5–9.0 (optimum, pH 7.5). Growth of strain WDS4C29 occurred at 10–45 °C (optimum, 40 °C), with 2–18 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 6 %) and at pH 6.5–9.0 (optimum, pH 7.5). Q-10 was the sole respiratory quinone of the two strains. The major polar lipids of strains WDS1C4 and WDS4C29 were phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. The major cellular fatty acid in strains WDS1C4 and WDS4C29 was C 7, and the genomic DNA G+C contents of strains WDS1C4 and WDS4C29 were 67.6 and 63.3 mol%, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strains WDS1C4 and WDS4C29 were members of the family and showed 94.3 and 95.3 % similarities to their closest relative, , respectively. The similarity between WDS1C4 and WDS4C29 was 97.3 %. Differential phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of the two isolates from recognized genera showed that the two strains should be classified as representing two novel species in a new genus for which the names gen. nov., sp. nov. (type species, type strain WDS1C4=MCCC 1H00179=KCTC 52542) and sp. nov. (WDS4C29=MCCC 1H00175=KCTC 52541) are proposed.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Science and Technology Fundamental Resources Investigation Program of China (Award 2019FY100700)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Zong-JunDu
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award 32070002, 31770002)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Zong-JunDu
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2021-06-25
2021-07-29
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