1887

Abstract

Six strictly anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria representing three novel species were isolated from the female reproductive tract. The proposed type strains for each species were designated UPII 199-6, KA00182 and BV3C16-1. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that the bacterial isolates were members of the genus . UPII 199-6 and KA00182 had 16S rRNA gene sequence identities of 99.9 % with 16S rRNA clone sequences previously amplified from the human vagina designated as type 1 and type 2, members of the human vaginal microbiota associated with bacterial vaginosis, preterm birth and HIV acquisition. UPII 199-6 exhibited sequence identities ranging from 92.9 to 93.6 % with validly named isolates and KA00182 had 16S rRNA gene sequence identities ranging from 92.6–94.2 %. BV3C16-1 was most closely related to with a 16S rRNA gene sequence identity of 95.4 %. Cells were coccoid or diplococcoid, non-motile and did not form spores. Genital tract isolates metabolized organic acids but were asaccharolytic. The isolates also metabolized amino acids. The DNA G+C content for the genome sequences of UPII 199-6, KA00182 and BV3C16-1 were 46.4, 38.9 and 49.8 mol%, respectively. Digital DNA–DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identity between the genital tract isolates and other validly named species suggest that each isolate type represents a new species. The major fatty acid methyl esters include the following: C, C, C dimethyl acetal (DMA) and summed feature 5 (C DMA and/or C 3-OH) in UPII 199-6; C and C 9 in KA00182; C; C 3-OH; and summed feature 5 in BV3C16-1. The isolates produced butyrate, isobutyrate, and isovalerate but there were specific differences including production of formate and propionate. Together, these data indicate that UPII 199-6, KA00182 and BV3C16-1 represent novel species within the genus . We propose the following names: sp. nov. for UPII 199-6 representing the type strain of this species (=DSM 111201=ATCC TSD-205), sp. nov. for KA00182 representing the type strain of this species (=DSM 111202=ATCC TSD-206) and sp. nov. for BV3C16-1 representing the type strain of this species (=DSM 111203=ATCC TSD-207).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Institutes of Health (Award U19AI120249)
    • Principle Award Recipient: SharonL. Hillier
  • National Institutes of Health (Award HG005816)
    • Principle Award Recipient: DavidN. Fredricks
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2021-02-22
2021-10-27
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