1887

Abstract

A facultatively anaerobic bacterium, strain S0837, was isolated from the marine sediment of Jingzi Wharf, Weihai, China. Cells of the novel strain were Gram-stain-negative, non-flagellated, non-gliding, non-pigmented and rod-shaped. Cells were around 0.3–0.5×1.0–1.4 µm in size and often appeared singly. Optimum growth occurred at 33 °C, with 2 % (w/v) NaCl and at pH 7.0–7.5. On the basis of the results of 16S rRNA gene sequences, stain S0837 had the closest relative with KCTC 32183 (98.0 %). Genome sequencing revealed a genome size of 3 785 026 bp, a G+C content of 59.8 mol% and several genes related with sulphur oxidation. The strain shared 98.0 % 16S rRNA sequence similarities with closely related type species and shared ANI value below 95–96 %, dDDH value of showed relatedness of 27.4, 25.2 and 25.2 % respectively with the closely related type species. Strain S0837 had ubiquinone-10 as the sole respiratory quinone, and possessed summed feature 8 (C 7cC 6c) as the major fatty acid. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. According to the results of the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic characterization, phylogenetic properties and genome analysis, strain S0837 should represent a novel species of the genus for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S0837 (=MCCC 1K04635=KCTC 72860).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Zong-JunDu , Science and Technology Basic Resources Investigation Program of China , (Award 2019FY100700)
  • Zong-JunDu , the National Natural Science Foundation of China , (Award 32070002, 31770002)
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2021-01-27
2021-02-26
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