1887

Abstract

During a study investigating the microbiota of raw milk and its semi-finished products, strains WS 5106 and WS 5096 were isolated from cream and skimmed milk concentrate. They could be assigned to the genus by their 16S rRNA sequences, but not to any validly named species. In this work, a polyphasic approach was used to characterize the novel strains and to investigate their taxonomic status. Examinations based on the topology of core genome phylogenomy as well as average nucleotide identity (ANIm) comparisons suggested a novel species within the subgroup. With pairwise ANIm values of 90.1 and 89.8 %, WS 5106 was most closely related to CECT 9765 and CECT 9766. The G+C content of strain WS 5106 was 60.1 mol%. Morphologic analyses revealed Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, catalase and oxidase positive, rod-shaped and motile cells. Proteolysis on skimmed milk agar as well as lipolysis on tributyrin agar occurred at both 28 and 6 °C. Tolerated growth conditions were temperatures between 4 and 34 °C, pH values between 6.0 and 8.0, and salt concentrations of up to 5 %. Fatty acid profiles showed a pattern typical for , with C as the dominant component. The major cellular polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol and the dominating quinone was Q-9. Based on these results, it is proposed to classify the strains as a novel species, sp. nov., with WS 5106 (=DSM 111143=LMG 31863) as type strain and WS 5096 (=DSM 111129=LMG 31864) as an additional strain.

Keyword(s): peptidase , Pseudomonas and raw milk
Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Forschungskreis der Ernährungsindustrie (Award AiF 20027N)
    • Principle Award Recipient: NotApplicable
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2020-12-08
2021-10-25
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