1887

Abstract

A polyphasic taxonomic approach was used to characterize a novel bacterium, designated as strain HDW20, isolated from the intestine of the dark diving beetle . The isolate was Gram-stain-positive, facultatively anaerobic, non-motile, coccus-shaped, and formed pale orange colonies. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and genome sequences showed that the isolate belonged to the genus in the phylum and was closely related to SST-39, JCM 17540, and NSG39, with the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 98.5 % and a highest average nucleotide identity (ANI) value of 80.6 %. The major cellular fatty acids were C 9 and anteiso-C. The main respiratory quinone was MK-9 (H). The major polar lipid components were phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. The genomic DNA G+C content was 69.0 %. The isolate contains ʟʟ-diaminopimelic acid, ʟ-alanine, and ʟ-lysine as amino acid components, and ribose, glucose, and galactose as sugar components of the cell wall peptidoglycan. The results of phylogenetic, phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and genotypic analyses suggested that strain HDW20 represents a novel species within the genus . We propose the name sp. nov. The type strain is HDW20 (=KACC 21348=KCTC 49324=JCM 33674).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Ministry of Environment (KR) (Award NIBR201801106)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Jin-WooBae
  • Ministry of Education (Award NRF-2019R1A6A3A01096031)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Dong-WookHyun
  • Ministry of Science and ICT (KR) (Award NRF-2020R1A2C3012797)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Jin-WooBae
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/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.004588
2020-12-08
2021-07-29
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