1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-motile and rod-shaped bacterium, designated KIS59-12, was isolated from a soil sample collected on Hodo island, Boryeong, Republic of Korea. The strain grew at 10–33 °C, pH 6.0–7.5 and with 0–4 % NaCl (w/v). Results of phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain KIS59-12 was in the same clade as Vu-144 and Gsoil809 with 97.5 and 97.2 % sequence similarity, respectively. Comparative genome analysis between strain KIS59-12 and Vu-144 showed that average nucleotide identity value was 69.4 % and the digital DNA–DNA hybridization value was 19.1 %. The major respiratory quinone was menaquinone-7. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine and an unknown polar lipid. The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C, iso-C G and iso-C 3-OH, which supported the affiliation of strain KIS59-12 with the genus . The major polyamines were homospermidine and putrescine. The genomic DNA G+C content was 36.4 mol%. On the basis of phylogenetic, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strain KIS59-12 represents a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of is KIS59-12 (=KACC 17340=NBRC 113161).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Hang-Yeon Weon , Rural Development Administration , (Award PJ01351901)
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/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.004566
2020-11-18
2021-03-02
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