1887

Abstract

A novel cold-tolerant bacterium, designated strain YJ56, was isolated from Antarctic soil collected from the Cape Burk area. Phylogenetic analysis through 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity revealed that strain YJ56 was most closely related to the genus , including DSM 20119 (99.06 % similarity), DSM 20136 (98.98 %) and ALL (98.76 %). The genome size (5.2 Mbp) of strain YJ56 was the largest among all the published genomes of type strains (4.2–5.0 Mbp). The genomic G+C content of strain YJ56 (64.7 mol%) was found to be consistent with those of other strains (62.0–71.0 mol%). The average nucleotide identity and average amino acid identity values between strain YJ56 and ALL were estimated at 84.1 and 84.2 %, respectively. The digital DNA–DNA hybridization value between the two strains was calculated to be 28.0 %. This rod-shaped and obligate aerobic strain exhibited no swimming or swarming motility. It had catalase activity but no oxidase activity. Cells grew at 4–28 °C (optimum, 13 °C) and pH 5.0–11.0 (optimum, pH 7.0) and with 0–6.0 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 0%) in Reasoner's 2A medium. MK-9 (H2) was the sole menaquinone. Two-dimensional TLC results revealed that the primary polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, two glycolipids and phosphatidylinositol. Fatty acid methyl ester analysis showed that anteiso-C, anteiso-C, iso-C, C and iso-C were the major cellular fatty acids in strain YJ56. Based on phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain YJ56 represents a novel species of the genus , and thus the name sp. nov is proposed. The type strain is YJ56 (=JCM 33881=KACC 21510).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Woojun Park , National Institute of Biological Resources , (Award NIBR202002108)
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/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.004505
2020-10-13
2021-03-02
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