1887

Abstract

A novel strain, designated NS18, was isolated from sediment sampled at Taihu Lake, PR China. Cells of the isolate were spherical, aerobic, non-motile, Gram-stain-positive and non-endospore-forming. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain NS18 clustered in a clade of the genus . Its closest phylogenetic neighbour was DSM 17612 with 98.2 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. The complete genome of NS18 was 2 736 037 bp and its genomic DNA G+C content was 72.8 mol%. The average nucleotide identity and digital DNA–DNA hybridization values between strain NS18 and DSM 17612 based on their whole genomes were 85.1 and 28.7 %, respectively. The major fatty acids were anteiso-C and anteiso-C. The predominant menaquinones were MK11 and MK12. The polar lipids comprised diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and two unidentified lipids. The components of the peptidoglycan were Ala, Gly, Asp, Thr and DAB. The whole-cell sugars contained rhamnose, ribose, xylose and glucose. According to the results of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses, strain NS18 (=NBRC 113859=MCCC 1K03759) represents a novel species, for which the name sp. nov is proposed.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Jian-Hang Qu , National Natural Science Foundation of China , (Award 31370147)
  • Jian-Hang Qu , Key Scientific Research Project of Colleges and Universities in Henan Province , (Award 20A180009)
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2020-08-07
2020-10-24
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