1887

Abstract

Strain SDU3-2 was isolated from a soil sample collected in Shandong Province, PR China. Cells of SDU3-2 were spherical, Gram-stain-positive, aerobic and non-motile. Cellular growth of the strain occurred at 25–45 °C, pH 5.5–8.5 and with 0–1.5 % (w/v) of NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain SDU3-2 was closest to the type strain ALT-1b with a similarity of 95.2 %. The draft genome was 3.49 Mbp long with 69.2 mol% G+C content. Strain SDU3-2 exhibited high resistance to gamma radiation (D >12 kGy) and UV (D >900 J m). The strain encoded many genes for resistance to radiation and oxidative stress, which were highly conserved with other species, but possessed interspecific properties. The major fatty acids of SDU3-2 cells were C 6, C 7/C 6, and C 8, the major menaquinone was menaquinone-8, and the major polar lipids were an unidentified phosphoglycolipid, four unidentified glycolipids and an unidentified phospholipid. The average nucleotide identity and DNA–DNA hybridization results further indicated that strain SDU3-2 represents a new species in the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SDU3-2 (=CGMCC 1.17147=KCTC 43098).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Yue-zhong Li , Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province , (Award No. ZR2016QZ002)
  • Duo-hong Sheng , Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China , (Award No. 2019FY100700)
  • Yue-zhong Li , Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China , (Award No. 2017FY100302,No. 2018YFA0900400,No. 2018YFA0901704)
  • Yue-zhong Li , National Natural Science Foundation of China , (Award Nos. 31670076 and 31471183)
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2020-08-10
2020-09-28
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