1887

Abstract

Fifteen isolates of the genus were obtained from Arctic soil samples. All isolates were Gram-stain-negative and rod-shaped. Cells were strictly aerobic, psychrotolerant and grew optimally at 15–20 °C. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that all the isolated strains formed a lineage within the family and clustered as members of the genus . The sole respiratory quinone was MK-7 and the major polar lipid was phosphatidylethanolamine. The major cellular fatty acids were summed feature 3 (iso-C2-OH/Cω7ω6), iso-C and iso-C 3-OH. The DNA G+C content of the novel strains was 33.9–41.8 mol%. In addition, the average nucleotide identity and DNA–DNA hybridization relatedness values between the novel type strains and phylogenetically related type strains were below the threshold values used for species delineation. Based on genomic, chemotaxonomic, phenotypic, phylogenetic and phylogenomic analyses, the isolated strains represent novel species in the genus , for which the names sp. nov. (type strain AR-2-6=KEMB 9005-717=KACC 19998=NBRC 113826), sp. nov. (type strain AR-3-17=KEMB 9005-718=KACC 19999=NBRC 113827), sp. nov. (type strain RP-1-13=KEMB 9005-720=KACC 21147=NBRC 113829), sp. nov. (type strain RP-1-14=KEMB 9005-721=KACC 21148=NBRC 113830), sp. nov. (type strain RP-3-8=KEMB 9005-724=KACC 21152=NBRC 113833), sp. nov. (type strain RP-3-11=KEMB 9005-725=KACC 21153=NBRC 113927), sp. nov. (type strain RP-3-15=KEMB 9005-726=KACC 21154=NBRC 113834), sp. nov. (type strain RP-3-21=KEMB 9005-728=KACC 21156=NBRC 113835) and sp. nov. (type strain RP-3-22=KEMB 9005-729=KACC 21157=NBRC 113836) are proposed.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Jaisoo Kim , National Research Foundation of Korea , (Award 2019R1F1A1058501)
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2020-03-11
2020-06-04
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