1887

Abstract

The genus in the family is known to be polyphyletic. Amino acid identity (AAI) values were calculated from whole-genome sequences of species of the genus and their distribution was found to be multi-modal. These naturally-occurring non-continuities were leveraged to standardise genus assignment of these species. We speculate that this multi-modal distribution is a consequence of loss of biodiversity during major extinction events, leading to the concept that a bacterial genus corresponds to a set of species that diversified since the Permian extinction. Transfer of nine species (, , and ) to the genus and eleven (, , , , , , , , and ) to the genus is proposed. Two novel species are described: sp. nov. and sp. nov. Evidence is presented to support the assignment of to a genus apart from to which comb nov. also belongs. The novel genus is proposed, to contain the type species comb. nov., along with comb. nov., and comb. nov.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Jeffrey D. Newman , National Science Foundation (US) , (Award 0960114)
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2020-10-23
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