1887

Abstract

An aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, yellowish, rod-shaped bacterium, designated DJ1R-1, was isolated from water sample from a volcanic lake, located on Da Hinggan Ling Mountain, PR China. Growth of DJ1R-1 optimally occurred at pH 7.0, at 22–25 °C and with 0–0.5 % (w/v) NaCl concentration. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that DJ1R-1 was clustered into the genus and showed 96.5 %, 95.9 % and 95.6 % similarities to D40P, 262-7 and B555-2, respectively. The predominant polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, one unidentified aminophospholipid, three unidentified aminolipids and one unidentified phospholipid. The major fatty acids were summed feature 8 (Cω7 / C ω6, 40.0 %), summed feature 3 (Cω7 / C ω6, 25.6 %) and C (13.7 %). The respiratory quinone was ubiquinone-10. The DNA G+C content was 65.0 % according to the genomic sequencing results. On the basis of the results of the phylogenetic analysis, physiological and biochemical properties comparisons, DJ1R-1 was proposed to represent a novel species of the genus , with the name . The type strain is DJ1R-1 (=CGMCC 1.13788=KCTC 72014).

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/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.003880
2019-12-18
2020-01-27
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