1887

Abstract

Strains HY041 and HY039 were oxidase- and Gram-stain-negative, catalase-positive, rod-shaped, non-motile, and facultatively anaerobic bacteria. They were isolated from the feces of bats of the and spp. collected from Chongqing City and Guangxi province (PR China), respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene and 463 core genes indicated that HY041 and HY039 represent members of the genus , forming a clade with wkB301 (95.2 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) and R-53146 (94.0 %). DNA–DNA hybridization (DDH) and average nucleotide identity (ANI) values of our isolates with the most closely related species were lower than the 70 % and 95–96 % threshold, respectively, in contrast to values above these two thresholds (DDH value: 89.1 %; ANI value: 98.5 %) between strains HY041 and HY039. The novel isolates could grow on nutrient and MacConkey agar. HY041 and HY039 could produce β-galactosidase and -acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, and utilize -adonitol, -mannose, gentiobiose, glucose and salicin. The major fatty acids (>10.0 %) of HY041 were C 3OH, C, C, summed feature 9 (C 10-methyl and/or -Cω9) and C 3OH. Polar lipids included phosphatidylethanolamine, glycolipid, two unidentified aminolipids and four unidentified lipids. Menaquinone 6 (MK-6) was the sole respiratory quinone. On the basis of all analyses so far, strains HY041 and HY039 represent a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HY041 (=CGMCC 1.16567=JCM 33423) with a genomic DNA G+C content of 32.2 mol%.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Key R&D Program of China (Award 2018YFC1200102)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Dong Jin
  • Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Sanming Project of Medicine in Shenzhen (Award SZSM201811071)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Jianguo Xu
  • Research Units of Discovery of Unknown Bacteria and Function (Award 2018RU010)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Jianguo Xu
  • National Science and Technology Major Project of China (Award 2018ZX10305409-003)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Zhihong Ren
  • National Science and Technology Major Project of China (Award 2018ZX10712001-007)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Jing Yang
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2021-08-04
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