1887

Abstract

A golden-pigmented, Gram-strain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped, non-flagellated and non-gliding bacterium, designated strain lm2, was isolated from activated sludge obtained from a wastewater treatment plant in Binzhou (Shandong province, PR China). Growth occurred at 15–45°C (optimum, 30 °C), in the presence of 0–5.0 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 0–2.0 %) and at pH 6.5–8.0 (optimum, pH 7.0–7.5). The chemotaxonomic, phenotypic and genomic traits were investigated. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain lm2 belonged to the genus , with highest sequence similarity to CC-CZW010 (97.1 %). Genome sequencing revealed a genome size of 3 611 894 bp and a G+C content of 34.9 mol%. The average nucleotide identity value and the digital DNA–DNA hybridization (dDDH) value between strain lm2 and JCM 30470 were 87.8 and 34.7 %, respectively. The major respiratory quinone was Menaquinone-6 (MK-6). The major fatty acids were iso-C, iso-C 3-OH and iso-C 9 and its polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), unidentified lipids (L1–5) and unidentified aminolipids (AL1–4). On the basis of these data, strain lm2 is considered to represent a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is lm2 (=KCTC 72529=CCTCC AB2019126).

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2019-10-29
2019-11-18
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