1887

Abstract

A nonphotosynthetic, Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped and motile strain, designated Pet-1, was isolated from oil-contaminated soil collected from Daqing oil field in China. Optimal growth occurred at 37 °C, pH 5.5 and in 1 % (w/v) NaCl. Q-10 was the sole respiratory quinone. The most abundant fatty acid was Cɷ7/Cɷ6 (67.4 %). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, aminolipid, phosphatidylethanolaine, phosphatidycholine, two unidentified lipids and two unidentified phospholipids. The genomic DNA G+C content was 69.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that Pet-1 shared the highest similarity (95.1 %) to DSM 18714, followed by sk2b1 (95.0 %) and CCUG 47968 (95.0 %). In the phylogenetic tree, strain Pet-1 formed a separate branch from the closely related genera and within the family . Based on the data from the current polyphasic study, it is proposed that the isolate is a novel species of a novel genus within the family , with the name gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of the type species is Pet-1 (=KCTC 72074 =CCTCC AB 2018368).

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/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.003795
2019-10-15
2019-11-13
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