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Abstract

A facultatively anaerobic and Gram-stain-negative bacterium, strain GY_G, was isolated from a river (Daedeock-cheon) in Daejeon, Republic of Korea. The isolate was catalase-positive, oxidase-positive and formed yellow colonies. Strain GY_G was phylogenetically classified as belonging in the genus . Its closely related strains were 03SU3-P (97.1 % similarity), T5 (96.9 %), JC216 (96.5 %), 01SU5-P (96.5 %) and G1A_585 (96.3 %) based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. The growth conditions for GY_G were at 10–45 °C (optimum, 25 °C), pH 6–10 (pH 7) and 0–4% NaCl (0.5–1.5 %). Strain GY_G could utilize turanose, -fructose-6-phosphate, glucuronamide, -keto-glutaric acid and acetoacetic acid. The major fatty acids of strain GY_G were summed features 8 (C 7/C 6; 40.6 %) and 3 (C 6/C 7; 24.7 %). The major quinone required for respiration was Q-10. The polar lipids of strain GY_G were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingolipid. The G+C content of the genome was 57.7 mol%. The average nucleotide identity and average amino acid identity values between strains GY_G and were 71.0 and 72.7 %, respectively. Based on phylogenetic and phenotypic attributes, we suggest that strain GY_G is a novel species in the genus and propose the name . The type strain is GY_G (=KCTC 62791=JCM 32855).

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2019-09-01
2019-09-22
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