1887

Abstract

A taxonomic study was carried out on a Gram-stain-negative bacterium, namely strain ANRC-JH13, isolated from a sediment sample collected at Jasper beach, adjacent to Fildes Peninsula, Antarctica. Cells of strain ANRC-JH13 were non-spore-forming rods and motile by the way of flagellum. Strain ANRC-JH13 was facultatively anaerobic, oxidase-positive, and catalase-positive. Growth of strain ANRC-JH13 occurred at 10–42 °C (optimum, 28 °C), pH 4.0–11.0 (pH 7.0) and 0–12.0 % (w/v) NaCl (1.0–2.0 %). Its predominant fatty acids were C16 : 0 (21.7 %), summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c; 38.3 %), and summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c; 20.1 %). Isoprenoid quinone Q-8 was the major respiratory quinone. Its major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, two unidentified aminolipids, and four unknown polar lipids. The DNA G+C content was 48 mol%. Strain ANRC-JH13 showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Amphritea balenae JAMM 1525 (97.9 %), followed by Amphritea atlantica M41 (97.8 %) and Amphritea japonica JAMM 1866 (97.3 %), and formed a lineage within the genus Amphritea on the phylogenetic trees. However, the in silico average nucleotide identity values between strain ANRC-JH13 and A. balenae JAMM 1525, A. atlantica M41, and A. japonica JAMM 1866 were 74.0, 76.7, and 74.9 %, respectively. The in silico DNA–DNA hybridization values between them were 19.8, 20.6, and 19.4 %, respectively. Based on the results from phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic analyses, strain ANRC-JH13 is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Amphritea , for which the name Amphritea opalescens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ANRC-JH13 (=MCCC 1K03512=KCTC 62532).

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.003359
2019-03-26
2019-09-20
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

  1. Gärtner A, Wiese J, Imhoff JF. Amphritea atlantica gen. nov., sp. nov., a gammaproteobacterium from the Logatchev hydrothermal vent field. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2008;58:34–39 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Miyazaki M, Nogi Y, Fujiwara Y, Kawato M, Nagahama T et al. Amphritea japonica sp. nov. and Amphritea balenae sp. nov., isolated from the sediment adjacent to sperm whale carcasses off Kagoshima, Japan. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2008;58:2815–2820 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Kim YO, Park S, Kim DN, Nam BH, Won SM et al. Amphritea ceti sp. nov., isolated from faeces of Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas). Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2014;64:4068–4072 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Jang H, Yang SH, Seo HS, Lee JH, Kim SJ et al. Amphritea spongicola sp. nov., isolated from a marine sponge, and emended description of the genus Amphritea. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2015;65:1866–1870 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Tindall BJ, Rosselló-Móra R, Busse HJ, Ludwig W, Kämpfer P. Notes on the characterization of prokaryote strains for taxonomic purposes. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2010;60:249–266 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Felföldi T, Somogyi B, Márialigeti K, Vörös L. Characterization of photoautotrophic picoplankton assemblages in turbid, alkaline lakes of the Carpathian Basin (Central Europe). J Limnol 2009;68:385–395 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Yoon SH, Ha SM, Kwon S, Lim J, Kim Y et al. Introducing EzBioCloud: a taxonomically united database of 16S rRNA gene sequences and whole-genome assemblies. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2017;67:1613–1617 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Kumar S, Stecher G, Tamura K. MEGA7: molecular evolutionary genetics analysis version 7.0 for bigger datasets. Mol Biol Evol 2016;33:1870–1874 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Saitou N, Nei M. The neighbor-joining method: a new method for reconstructing phylogenetic trees. Mol Biol Evol 1987;4:406–425 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Felsenstein J. Evolutionary trees from DNA sequences: a maximum likelihood approach. J Mol Evol 1981;17:368–376 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Rzhetsky A, Nei M. Statistical properties of the ordinary least-squares, generalized least-squares, and minimum-evolution methods of phylogenetic inference. J Mol Evol 1992;35:367–375 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Auch AF, Klenk HP, Göker M. Standard operating procedure for calculating genome-to-genome distances based on high-scoring segment pairs. Stand Genomic Sci 2010;2:142–148 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Meier-Kolthoff JP, Göker M, Spröer C, Klenk HP. When should a DDH experiment be mandatory in microbial taxonomy?. Arch Microbiol 2013;195:413–418 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Goris J, Konstantinidis KT, Klappenbach JA, Coenye T, Vandamme P et al. DNA-DNA hybridization values and their relationship to whole-genome sequence similarities. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2007;57:81–91 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Wayne LG. International committee on systematic bacteriology: report of the ad hoc committee on reconciliation of approaches to bacterial systematics. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1987;37:463–464
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Richter M, Rosselló-Móra R. Shifting the genomic gold standard for the prokaryotic species definition. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2009;106:19126–19131 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Dong XZ, Cai MY. Determinative Manual for Routine Bacteriology (English translation) Beijing: Scientific Press; 2001; pp.355–356
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Kämpfer P, Kroppenstedt RM. Numerical analysis of fatty acid patterns of coryneform bacteria and related taxa. Can J Microbiol 1996;42:989–1005 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Sasser M. Identification of Bacteria by Gas Chromatography of Cellular Fatty Acids, MIDI Technical 1990 Note 101. Newark, DE: MIDI Inc;
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Collins MD, Jones D. Distribution of isoprenoid quinone structural types in bacteria and their taxonomic implication. Microbiol Rev 1981;45:316–354[PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Collins MD, Jones D. A note on the separation of natural mixtures of bacterial ubiquinones using reverse-phase partition thin-layer chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography. J Appl Bacteriol 1981;51:129–134 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Embley TM, Wait R. Structural lipids of eubacteria. In Goodfellow M, O’Donnell AG. (editors) Chemical Methods in Prokaryotic Systematics Chichester: Wiley; 1994; pp.121–161
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.003359
Loading
/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.003359
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Supplementary File 1

PDF

Most Cited This Month

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error