1887

Abstract

A yellow-pigmented, Gram-stain-negative, gliding and rod-shaped bacterial strain, designated zong2l5, was isolated from a forest soil sample at Dinghu Mountain, Guangdong Province, PR China. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain zong2l5 belongs to the genus Lysobacter , and was most closely related to Lysobacter enzymogenes KCTC 12131 (97.7 %) and Lysobacter soli KCTC 22011 (97.6 %). The novel strain showed an average nucleotide identity (ANI) value of 81.5 % and a digital DNA–DNA hybridization (dDDH) value of 25.3 % with L. enzymogenes KCTC 12131 based on draft genome sequences, followed by L. soli KCTC 22011 with ANI and dDDH values of 79.4 % and 22.7 %, respectively. The DNA G+C content of strain zong2l5 based on the whole genome sequence was 69.2 mol%. The major fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, iso-C17 : 0 and summed feature 9 (iso-C17 : 1ω9c and/or 10-methyl C16 : 0). Strain zong2l5 contained Q-8 as the major isoprenoid quinone and the major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidyl-N-methylethanolamine, phosphatidylethanolamine, three unidentified phospholipids and an unidentified aminolipid. The phenotypic, genotypic and chemotaxonomic anlyses clearly showed that strain zong2l5 represents a novel species of the genus Lysobacter , for which the name Lysobacter silvisoli sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is zong2l5 (=GDMCC 1.1489=KCTC 52923).

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2018-11-13
2020-11-25
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