1887

Abstract

A curved-rod-shaped bacterium was isolated from a marine (100 m depth) water sample collected from Bay of Bengal, Visakhapatnam, India. Strain NIO-S14, was Gram-stain-negative, motile and pale-yellow. NIO-S14 was able to grow aerobically and anaerobically and could utilize a number of organic substrates. Major fatty acids were C12 : 0, iso-C13 : 0, C14 : 0, iso-C15 : 0, C16 : 0 and C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c (summed feature 3). NIO-S14 contained diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, two unidentified aminophospholipids and six unidentified lipids as polar lipids. The DNA G+C content of NIO-S14 was 47.9 mol%. The 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons indicated that the isolate represented a member of the family Shewanellaceae within the class Gammaproteobacteria . According to the results of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, NIO-S14 was closely related to Shewanella corallii with a pair-wise sequence similarity of 99.26 %. On the basis of the sequence comparison, NIO-S14 clustered with Shewanella corallii and together they clustered with Shewanella mangrovi and seven other species of the genus Shewanella but were distantly related. DNA–DNA hybridization between NIO-S14 and Shewanella corallii DSM 21332revealed a relatedness of 35 %. Distinct morphological, physiological and genotypic differences from these previously described taxa supported the classification of NIO-S14 as a representative of a novel species of the genus Shewanella , for which the name Shewanella submarina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Shewanella submarina is NIO-S14 (=MTCC 12524=KCTC 52277=LMG 30752).

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2018-11-30
2019-10-22
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