1887

Abstract

Five bacterial strains, UAE-HKU57, UAE-HKU58, UAE-HKU59, UAE-HKU60 and UAE-HKU61, were isolated in Dubai, UAE, from necrotic foot tissue samples of four dromedaries (Camelus dromedarius) and associated maggots (Wohrlfartia species). They were non-sporulating, Gram-negative, non-motile bacilli. They grew well under aerobic conditions at 37 °C, but not anaerobically. The pH range for growth was pH 7.0–9.0 (optimum, pH 7.5–8.0) and the strains could tolerate NaCl concentrations (w/v) up to 2 % (optimum, 0.5 %). They were catalase- and cytochrome oxidase-positive, but caseinase-, gelatinase- and urease-negative. Their phenotypic characters were distinguishable from other closely related species. Phylogenetic analyses of the almost-complete 16S rRNA gene and partial 23S rRNA gene, gyrB, groEL and recA sequences revealed that the five isolates were most closely related to undescribed Ignatzschineria strain F8392 and Ignatzschineria indica, but in most phylogenies clustered separately from these close relatives. Average nucleotide identity analysis showed that genomes of the five isolates (2.47–2.52 Mb, G+C content 41.71–41.86 mol%) were 98.00–99.97% similar to each other, but ≤87.18 % similar to other Ignatzschineria species/strains. Low DNA relatedness between the five isolates to other Ignatzschineria species/strains was also supported by Genome-to-Genome Distance Calculator analysis. The chemotaxonomic traits of the five strains were highly similar. They were non-susceptible (intermediate or resistant) to tetracycline and resistant to trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole. The name Ignatzschineria cameli sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate these five strains, with strain UAE-HKU57 (=CCOS1165=NBRC 113042) as the type strain.

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2018-10-10
2019-12-15
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