1887

Abstract

A novel anaerobic, non-spore-forming bacterium was isolated from a faecal sample of a healthy adult. The isolate, designated strain YI, was cultured in a basal liquid medium under a gas phase of H2/CO2 supplemented with yeast extract (0.1 g l). Cells of strain YI were short rods (0.4–0.7×2.0–2.5 µm), appearing singly or in pairs, and stained Gram-positive. Catalase activity and gelatin hydrolysis were positive while oxidase activity, indole formation, urease activity and aesculin hydrolysis were negative. Growth was observed within a temperature range of 20–45 °C (optimum, 35–37 °C), and a pH range of 5.0–8.0 (optimum pH 7.0–7.5). Doubling time was 2.3 h when grown with glucose at pH 7.2 and 37 °C. Besides acetogenic growth, the isolate was able to ferment a large range of monomeric sugars with acetate and butyrate as the main end products. Strain YI did not show respiratory growth with sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate or nitrate as electron acceptors. The major cellular fatty acids of the isolate were C16 : 0 and C18 : 0. The genomic DNA G+C content was 47.8 mol%. Strain YI is affiliated to the genus Eubacterium , sharing highest levels of 16S rRNA gene similarity with Eubacterium limosum ATCC 8486 (97.3 %), Eubacterium callanderi DSM 3662 (97.5 %), Eubacterium aggregans DSM 12183 (94.4 %) and Eubacterium barkeri DSM 1223 (94.8 %). Considering its physiological and phylogenetic characteristics, strain YI represents a novel species within the genus Eubacterium , for which the name Eubacterium maltosivorans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YI (=DSM 105863=JCM 32297).

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2018-10-04
2019-12-12
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